Current Classes and Workshops

Date: Saturday, October 27, 2018, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Type: Generative Workshop, Workshop
Genre: Poetry

A poem contains multiple kinds of intelligence. Beneath the meanings of the words that make up a poem, other forms of meaning strive to be felt. This workshop will explore two of the most prominent of those alternate intelligences: musicality and image. Following the poet Louis Zukofsky’s sense, “Lower limit speech / Upper limit music,” we’ll seek ways, through readings and through in-class experiments, to re-awaken our ear to the musical intelligence undergirding language.


Two Poetry Workshops
Andrea Scarpino

Date: Friday, November 16, 2018, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, November 17, 2018, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
Type: Workshop
Genre: Poetry

Join teacher, poet, author, and Piper Writers Studio Visiting Faculty, Andrea Scarpino for two unique poetry workshop opportunities on Friday, November 16 and/or Saturday, November 17. If you bundle both classes for the Poetry Writers Intensive, you save even more!

Scarpino joins the Piper Writers Studio from St. Louis, Missouri and will be in town for only these two days to work with writers around the valley on building their skills in poetry as witness and in consideration of the body. Seats are limited, so register early.

 


Date: Monday, November 19, 2018, 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Type: Conversation, Discussion, Lecture, Reading
Genre: Multi-genre, Poetry

What are the physical and metaphysical conditions of borders and borderlands? How do borders span the imaginary, emotional, and physical landscapes of the human condition? Join a conversation and reading with poet and educator, Eduardo Corral, exploring the imaginative, bodily, societal, political, emotional, physical, and linguistic impacts of borders to us as human beings, our connections, and our artistic bodies of work.  


Date: Mondays, December 3 - 10, 2018, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Type: Generative Workshop, Lecture
Genre: Fiction, Science Fiction

We sit on the edge of possibility. From Roddenberry’s sliding doors and tablet PCs to Atwood’s dystopian floods, our stories point the way to possible futures. This is a class about writing those futures. Participants will explore the basic elements of creating strong fiction and learn how to weave those elements into the extraordinary worlds we carve out of fringe science and the environmental issues shaping our tomorrows. Participants will engage with existing genre work ranging from Bacigalupi to Zelzany to learn the finer points of craft.