General Information, Directions, Parking

General Information

Directions

Parking

How did the Piper Writers House come to be?

Virginia Piper Center for Writing, 5.23.2006The historic President’s Cottage on the ASU Tempe Campus is the home of the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. Located on the corner of Palm Walk and Tyler Mall, the house was constructed in 1907 and served as the home of the university’s president until 1959. Since that time, it has been used by the ASU Alumni Association for administrative offices (1961 to 1972) and as the home of the University Archives (1972 to 1995). The house, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is especially fitting as a home for the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing, as Robert Frost visited there twice as the guest of then-President Grady Gammage.

What goes on at the Piper Writers House?

The house and grounds serve as a vibrant, nurturing environment in which writers, faculty, students, and community members can exchange ideas and share an appreciation for literature and writing. This unique facility provides essential space for classes, seminars, two formal reception areas, administrative offices, a library, as well as an outdoor performance area and writers garden. While the Piper Writers House evokes the particular warm atmosphere, deep historical roots, and imaginative energy that characterize the ASU Creative Writing Program, it is also the launching ground for new initiatives that connect diverse communities.

Can I schedule an event at the Piper Writers House?

The Piper Center for Creative Writing staff will occasionally consider scheduling outside events and meetings for university groups and community partners on an individual basis. These events must provide their own staffing and supplies, and must abide by all Piper Writers House rules and policies.

 



 

Where is the Piper Writers House?

Situated in the historic heart of ASU’s Tempe Campus, the Virginia G. Piper Writers House is easily accessible by bike, car, or public transportation.  Parking can be found in the Fulton Garage on S. College Ave near the intersection of University Drive, and the Piper Writers House is just a short walk across University and slightly to the left of Old Main by following the path between Old Main and the University Club leading away from the courtyard.  The house is surrounded by small gardens and its entrance faces Tyler Mall, near the intersection of Palm Walk.

*For a detailed map of the ASU Campus, click here.*

How long does it take to park and walk?

We recommend you give yourself at least 15 minutes between parking your vehicle and arriving at the center, especially during the school year. University, Mill, Apache, and College often become backed-up during peak drive times.



Where can I park?

Various parking structures and lots on the ASU campuses offer attended parking where guests pull a ticket upon entrance to one of these gate-controlled facilities and pay upon exiting. Cash, Visa and MasterCard accepted.
LOCATION HOURS OF OPERATION
HOURLY RATES
(1/2/3/4 hrs)
MAXIMUM EXIT FEE
Apache Boulevard Parking Structure SUMMER HOURS Mon-Fri:
7am-8:30pm^
$3/6/8/10 $10
Rural Road Parking Structure #
# Visitors must enter by traveling west on Terrace Road from Rural Road.
SUMMER HOURS Mon-Fri:
7am-8:30pm^
$3/6/8/10 $10
ASU Fulton Center Structure* SUMMER HOURS Mon-Fri:
7am-8:30pm^
$3/6/9/12 $12
^Hours vary between the school year and summer/winter breaks. Please see posted signs at structures’ entrances. Vehicles remaining in the structure past the posted closing time will be issued a “failure to pay exit fee” citation.

 

Parking Map

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